Interns

WyomingView internships are aimed at promoting educational opportunities in remote sensing and workforce development. These semester-long internships provide opportunities for UW undergraduate and graduate students to address natural resources management issues using remote sensing science and technology. These scholarships are part of the grant provided by AmericaView & USGS to WyomingView.

Testimonials from WyomingView interns are listed below (by academic year):

2015-'16

WyomingView offered scholarships to undergraduate students to incorporate remotely sensed data in their research. This years' recipients: Julia Collins, Colleen Friday, Rhiannon Jakopak, Cameron Sloan and Elizabeth Wirsching).

63) Elizabeth Wirsching (BS Rangeland Ecol. & Watershed Mgt)
This internship has been vastly important to my career. It has given me the opportunity to do the kind of work I hope to be doing in the future. And more than just something to put on my resume, it has given me something I can so to future perspective employers as an example of the type of work I have done and the quality of work I will do.

Elizabeth (pictured right) presented her work with Jackie Alexander (left)in the 2016 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2016.


62) Cameron Sloan (BS Energy Resources)

My research experience during the semester allowed me to expand upon previous skills learned with GIS and remote sensing, and apply them to a real world application. I have learned many technical and problem solving skills through this opportunity that will help me to excel in my future career.


He presented his work in the 2016 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2016.

 
61) Rhionnan Jakopak (BS Wildlife and Fisheries Biology & Mgt)
My internship with WyomingView allowed me a unique and immensely beneficial opportunity to work with remotely sensed data while addressing a question that is relevant to my research interests. By working on my own project with the greatly appreciated direction of Dr. Sivanpillai, I was able to gain analytical and communication skills. I enjoyed developing the ability to think about the challenges associated with employing remotely sensed data. Finally, my experience was beneficial because it allowed me to gain a better appreciation of the multiple and varied applications for remotely sensed data. 

She presented her work in the 2016 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2016.

 60) Colleen Friday (BS Rangeland Ecol. & Watershed Mgt.)
Taking the undergraduate research course during the Spring 2016 semester was a learning experience.  I was challenged to balance the responsibilities for the research and other course work.  I gained a variety and skills and applications for conducting an independent research study.  I furthered my knowledge of remote sensing, using the ERADAS Image 2015 software, and my experience analyzing the data.  I also was able to practice my presentation skills by participating in the Undergraduate Research Day where I presented my work in a clear logical manner to an audience.

She presented her work in the 2016 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2016.

59) Julia Collins (BS Rangeland Ecol. & Watershed Mgt.)

The research I conducted with Landsat 8 imagery on Wyoming alfalfa fields helped me further understand how remotely sensed data can efficiently and inexpensively be used to monitor or map vegetation growth.  This work will be beneficial for me in future land management projects in my career.  

She presented her work in the 2016 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2016.




2014-'15

WyomingView offered scholarships to undergraduate students to incorporate remotely sensed data in their research. This years' recipients: Nathan Hough (fall '14), Hayden Bales, Blake Balzan, Greg Galli, Ina Goodman, Luke Nieslanik, Chris Sheets, Skye Swoboda-Colberg, and Preston Talbert (spring '15).

58) Preston Talbert (BS Agroecology)
Skills that I have gained from using Landsat data will be helpful as I move into precision agriculture. Communication skills from group collaboration will help me as I work with peers throughout school and throughout my career. From this research using Landsat 8 on range land crops, I learned to be patient and not to be discouraged when results don't happen as planned. The presentation at URD gave me more experience in public speaking, as well as how to present myself and information to people who are not interested or as knowledgeable in that particular study area. Overall it was a very good experience.

He presented his work with Luke Nieslanik in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.

57) Skye Swoboda-Colberg (BS Geography)
I enjoyed quantifying the operator error in the unsupervised classification of images because it was a great way to reinforce data management and verification skills. Mistakes were occasionally made between transformations from data to images to maps and I spent a considerable amount of time accounting for these mistakes.  I will continue to work with Landsat images and appreciate this opportunity to work with Wyoming View.  I enjoyed presenting at the UW Undergraduate Research Day because it reinforced the importance of this research and has motivated me to continue to develop my remote sensing skills.

He presented his work with Chris Sheets in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.

56) Chris Sheets (BS Earth System Science)
This project has given me the very valuable experience of presenting a scientific study to an audience.  Producing a study that compares analyst bias can be very helpful to companies or other scientists by demonstrating how much bias each scientist can have when classifying an image.  Using Landsat data can also make classifying images difficult because of the 900 square meter pixels that can blur a lot of smaller details on the ground.

The skills and knowledge that I gained from this experiment can be applied to future studies where scientists could set a strict list of rules to follow when classifying in order to reduce bias as much as possible.

He presented his work with Skye Swoboda-Colberg in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.

55)  Luke Nieslanik (BS Agroecology)
Being able to conduct research on the use of Landsat 8 satellite imagery for remote sensing of vegetation was a great opportunity. It increased my confidence in communicating with my peers and overall increased my understanding of research methods and remote sensing. One thing I realized during this experience was that there are many obstacles and unexpected results. Although it is discouraging at times, it promotes improvement which may lead to great success.  In the future I will be able to attribute some of my success to the increased communication skills and scientific understanding  gained from this research experience.

He presented his work along with Preston Talbert in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.

54)  Ina Goodman (BS Biology)
This research and presentation at the Undergraduate Research Day 2015 taught me a variety of skills and applications. It furthered my knowledge of remote sensing, my level of remote sensing interpretation, and skill level regarding the use of ERDAS Imagine 2014. Overall, the project was a worthwhile experience, building not only my ability to create and implement a research project, but also my ability to present and share a research project in a clear, understandable manner.

She presented her work in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.


53) Greg Galli (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Doing the undergraduate study program this semester I learned more about remote sensing, especially on rule based classification. In my study I was able to understand if sun angle incidence affected Landsat imagery through the use of NDWI (Normalized Difference Wetness Index). Doing this research study has not only taught me more about my field of study, but also how organization skills play a key role when working on a project and trying to balance other workloads If you are looking to learn more about your field and for a challenge, then I recommend doing the undergraduate research program.

He presented his work in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.


52)  Blake Balzan (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
After this year’s Undergrad research project I have discovered a way to bring together the things I have learned here at the University of Wyoming and combine it with agriculture from my hometown. I do not know what will happen next on this path but it tends to be interesting so far.  At first I was leery about doing this undergrad research project but I’m glad I did and it turned out to be quite enjoyable.  I am highly excited to be graduating this year from UW, and believe that by venturing out away from the things I normally do, I have become ready to take the leap and start my own adventure in this wondrous world.

He presented his work in the 2015 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on May 2, 2015.

51)  Hayden Bales (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I applied skills that I learned in the classroom to a real life project analyzing agricultural fields that I manage as a ranch-hand.  During my research I gained a greater understanding of how Landsat imagery can be used to monitor healthy vegetation by using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index.  I believe this internship has helped me become more confident in gathering data from remote sensing imagery, conducting an analysis to produce results, and drawing sound conclusions from my research.



50) Nathan Hough (BS Wildlife, Fisheries Biology & Mgt)
This independent study provided me with an opportunity to better my GIS and Remote Sensing skills by applying the knowledge I have gained through various courses into a real world situation.In this independent study I helped assess whether using Landsat imagery with different indices (such as NDVI) could be used as a viable alternative for electrical conductivity values, used in agriculture to estimate crop yield, thus reducing the cost of precision agriculture. This course also provided key experience into the world of writing and publishing scientific literature. The geospatial knowledge I have gained through this independent study will greatly assist me in finding a job in the Wildlife Biology field and has already added an additional component to my resume.



2013-'14

WyomingView offered scholarships to undergraduate students to incorporate remotely sensed data in their research. This years' recipients: Ryan Lermon and Emily (Stecker) Richardson


49) Ryan Lermon (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
My Experience with the WyomingView internship has been great. Getting the opportunity to work with more remote sensing data after I took the class last semester was exciting. I learned how to use ERDAS more efficiently and a few short cuts that I didn't know of from my first experiences with the program. I am glad to have had the chance to work with many different types of projects (water, fire, forest, etc.). Towards the end of the semester I was given the option to present my work at the undergraduate research day. I thought that was very rewarding to be able to show others what I had been working on in the past few months. I am interested to see what remote sensing experiences I will have in the future.

He presented his work in the 2014 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 26, 2014. Title: Prescribed burn severity mapping using Landsat 8 data

48) Emily (Stecker) Richardson (BS Botany)
Being knowledgeable in the field of remote sensing is a very valuable skill. From the WyomingView internship I have gained confidence in my ability to obtain and decipher remote sensing images and software, and have learned how diversely applicable and efficient it can be. This opportunity has given me tools that I am thankful to have and look forward to using as I begin my graduate education in forest ecosystems.


She presented her work in the 2014 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 26, 2014. Title: Monitoring Aspen Phenology along an Elevation Gradient using MODIS data.


2012-'13

WyomingView offered scholarships to undergraduate students to incorporate remotely sensed data in their research. This years' recipients Emmalee Allen, Cody Booth, Erik Collier, Kaitlyn McCollum, Kate Richarson, Christopher Stienhoff, Bailey Terry, Matthew Thoman  describe their work below.

47) Emmalee Allen (BS Agroecology)
What I gained from my experience during my remote sensing internship is overall confidence. I have learned the procedure of research and the processes necessary to present and finish. I now have a tool in my toolbox that I can use in the future. As I prepare to work with small-scale farmers I know that remote sensing is still a possibility to track crop growth. Thank you for this opportunity as I have learned a great deal and have gained confidence which is important as I prepare to step out into the working world.
She presented her work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013. Title: Monitoring crop growth before and under center-pivot irrigation system using multi-temporal Landsat images.

46) Cody Booth (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
The internship opportunity was very influential in teaching me about remote sensing and real world application of this technology. Remote sensing is a useful tool that can help make management decisions and this internship opportunity taught me how to use this technology correctly. I plan to use this knowledge in the future to help answer some of the questions I may have pertaining to the restoration and reclamation fields.
He presented his work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013. Title: Estimating intra-annual changes in the surface area of Sand Mesa Reservoir #1 using multi-temporal Landsat images

45) Erik Collier (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I learned a valuable skill from being introduced to the field of remote sensing. I am currently employed with the Bureau of Land Management and see many uses for this technology in my future career. Mapping burn severity can pinpoint where you need to allocate your resources after both wildfires as well as prescribed burns. After taking this class I feel I have a valuable skill set that can only benefit me in my future profession.
He presented his work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013. Title: Mapping Burn Severity of the Marking Pen Prescribed Burn in the Seminoe Mountains using pre- and post-fire Landsat Thematic Mapper images

44) Carson Hessenthaler (BS Applied Economics)
The WyomingView scholarship enabled me to research how remote sensing can be used to monitor crop growth. The research and presenting skills is something that will help not only me, but my families farming operation. I was able to learn what it takes to make a presentation and how to present what I had found in my research. The research on monitoring crop growth is something that I want to continue doing; so that I can help increase the productivity of the farm.   Remote sensing is something that farmers need to utilize more, and I am grateful that I was able to be a part of the WyomingView scholarship.
He presented his work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013. Title: Tracking sugar beet/corn growth in a Wyoming farm using Landsat images

43) Kaitlyn McCollum (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
From this research I have learned that there is a lot more ways remote sensing can be used for water. There is more than just classifying images, involving indices and using/manipulating thresholds makes it possible to determine how much water a lake or reservoir is holding without actually going to the location. This creates a way to gain more information about these remote locations. I now understand the time and work that goes into conducting a research project, it is a lot more than just going to class every day. This knowledge will prepare me for the employment world; I can tackle a project without being completely in the dark. I also gained some very useful skills on how to create a presentation and give that presentation to a group of professional.  Overall it this project was a great experience and I was able to gain more knowledge and skills than just from the actual research.
She presented her work with co-author Matthew Thoman, in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013.Title: Assessing Transferability of Landsat-derived NDWI Values across Space and Time.

42) Kate Richardson (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I really learned a lot from this research project. Using ERDAS IMAGINE was a good experience in how to process a satellite image, especially in running an unsupervised classification.  I was also surprised to learn that cloud contamination is such a big problem in much of the Western United States.  If a solution could be found to get around that, remote sensing would be realistic for many different long term studies.  It could also one day be imperative to management plans; especially for water bodies.
She presented her work with in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013.Title: Limitations in Delineating Lake Shoreline in Cloud Contaminated Landsat Images.

41) Christopher Steinhoff (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
This internship gave me the opportunity to further my knowledge and understanding of remote sensing.  In turn this can only benefit my future career in resource management and help me to implement better and more efficient monitoring tactics.
He presented his work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013.Title: Mapping Changes in Reservoir Surface Area Using Landsat Thematic Mapper Images.


40) Bailey Terry (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I have learned lots of things through remotes sensing this year. My project on classifying bias in unsupervised classification has taught me where bias was found in images, but more importantly it showed me how accurate unsupervised classification can be. I think remote sensing has a great future, and I look forward to using it as I continue on in the range profession.
She presented her work in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013.Title: Characterizing analyst bias in unsupervised classification of Landsat images.

39) Matthew Thoman (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Remote sensing has always interested me since the first day I heard about it in a class. Being able to use satellite images for remote sensing was just a plus. The skills I learned by being able to do these remote sensing projects will come in very useful when I graduate. Being a Rangeland Ecology Watershed Management major, my experience in remote sensing and image classification of both water and land will help make me a more marketable candidate for most jobs. It has been a fun experience and the knowledge I acquired will be very helpful.
He presented his work with co-presenter Kaitlyn McCollum in the 2013 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 27, 2013. Title: Assessing Transferability of Landsat-derived NDWI Values across Space and Time.


2011-'12

WyomingView offered five scholarships to undergraduate students and two scholarships to graduate student to recognize their use of remotely sensed data in their research. This years' recipients Orin Hutchinson, Jason Pindell, Brandt Schiche, Matthew Thoman, and Mike Pritchard  describe their work below.

38) Orin Hutchinson (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
What I received from this opportunity to work with remote sensing and data analysis was a broader perspective of what this kind of technology can do and what activities may in the future be done by remote sensing. My project was centered on wildfire monitoring and I was able to see that in some cases, time and resources may be better allocated by using images rather than taking a field trip out to the site. This experience has taught me to keep an open mind about what technology can and cannot do and it has given me another tool that I will be able to use in my future career.

He presented his work in the 2012 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 21, 2012.
Title:Monitoring post-wildfire vegetation regeneration in the Northern Black Hills of Wyoming using Landsat images.


37) Spencer Otto (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I learned a lot this semester while working on this research project. The hands on research gave me better understanding of how remote sensing is applied to agriculture. While reading literature on my subject I learned that the field of remote sensing applies to many areas of natural resource management. Performing independent research also taught me skills to improve time management.

36) Jason Pindell (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Through the course of completing this work I have learned several valuable skills that will be used throughout my future career. The content of this course is as good as you make it, and the results that I found were very interesting. Working with Dr. Sivanpillai has been rewarding to say the least. Participating in undergraduate research day also presents challenges and skills that will be useful in future career endeavors. Addressing the public about complicated projects that you have worked from start to finish is a very good exercise and will no doubt be beneficial.

He presented his work in the 2012 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 21, 2012.
Title: Mapping aspen phenology with MODIS 8-day composites.
 

35) Brandt Schiche (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Research in the area of remote sensing has provided me with an understanding of the concepts that will be valuable in any career in natural resources.  Mapping the changes of water surface area proved to be both accurate and beneficial to work related to my study.  My research allowed me to understand the importance of alternative management, in the form of remote sensing, that I never knew existed.  In a society were specialization is key, remote sensing occupies a special niche.


He presented his work in the 2012 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 21, 2012.
Title:Mapping Changes in the Surface Area of Woodruff Narrows using Landsat Images.

34) Matthew Thoman (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
The knowledge I acquired by learning and using ERDAS and GIS mapping in this course has been new and exciting in this everyday monotony of school. Not only has it been fun but stimulating and useful as well. There are many applications for remote sensing that I can use, such as mapping growth on our family farm/ranch and a skill that will be useful in the workplace. With a degree in Rangeland Ecology/Watershed management the newer technology of remote sensing will be very applicable and will hopfully make me more employable.

He presented his work in the 2012 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 21, 2012.
Title: Mapping wheat growth in dryland fields in SE Wyoming using Landsat images.


33) Florence Kothapalley (MS Civil Engineering)
Having an enthusiasm to work for GIS and Remote Sensing projects, I have taken up the project Glacier and Landsat Mapping for Wyoming as an independent study for Spring 2012 to participate in the Wyoview Scholarship program and gain knowledge on Remote Sensing topics and usage of ERDAS Imagine software as well as learn new methods in GIS.

32) Michael L Pritchard (Masters special student)
Through this WyomingView internship I have learned and worked with many challenges of acquiring, organizing, and maintaining a collection of Landsat Imagery for the state of Wyoming.  The Landsat data in this collection are from diverse sources over many years, some of it older imagery in forms such as nearest neighbor, which may not be available from any other source.  Quality control carefully examined for errors, header information, and various other factors which determine the usefulness of this data.  The goal is to encourage the use of Landsat imagery by making it available in a form easily used by people of diverse levels of expertise in working with remote sensing data.


2010-'11

The WyomingView program offered three scholarships to undergraduate students and one scholarship to graduate student to recognize their use of remotely sensed data in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years' recipients; Blake Cobb, Claire Hudson, Tyrell Perry, and Paul Arendt describe their work below.

31) Blake Cobb (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I Learned several different things by taking the remote sensing class. While working for the forest service i learned that remote sensing is an integral part of making the maps that help people make important decisions. I learned that by using remote sensing you can evaluate things like fire severity and grazing management.

By taking this class I am now able to use remote sensing and can use apply it in the future when i am required to evaluate things and make these important decisions.

He presented his work in the 2011 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2011.
Title:Mapping Forest Burn Severity Using Non Anniversary Date Satellite Images.

30) Claire Hudson (BS Biology)
I recently graduated with a B.S. in biology and am going on to get my M.S. in botany. My project, funded by WyomingView, used MODIS images to characterize the relationship between NDVI and ambient temperature in two forest types in the Snowy Range Mountains, WY and examined how the relationship changed with bark beetle attack.

This project was my first experience working with remotely sensed images, and taught me how large-scale satellite images can be used to determine ecological relationships at a smaller scale. The skills I acquired working with remotely sensed images during this project will continue to serve me throughout my graduate studies and in my future career.

She presented her work in the 2011 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2011.
Title: Remote Sensing of Vegetation Response following Bark Beetle Attack in the Snowy Range Mountains, Wyoming.

29) Tyrell Perry (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Through this internship I became aware of how we can use technology in manipulating images to find answers to questions without having to make trips to the field.  In my project I was able to differentiate Salt Cedar (Tamarisk spp.) from native vegetation on the Powder River in Sheridan County, WY.  Invasive species like Salt Cedar and many others are becoming hot topics in rangeland ecology and remote sensing technologies are very useful in mapping stands of invasive species remotely, saving lots of time and money.

He presented his work in the 2011 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 30, 2011.
Title: Spectral Reflectance of Salt Cedar and Cottonwood along the Powder River, Sheridan, WY.


28) Paul Arendt (MA Geography)
I performed a GIS analysis upon six years of Landsat imagery to examine spectral trends in the decline of mountain pine beetle-affected stands within the Medicine Bow National Forest.  The study focused on how damage varied according to the factors of site exposure and elevation.  While the emphasis was on spectral trends in Landsat imagery, aerial photography and USDA Forest Service survey data were also used to accurately identify affected stands.



2009-'10

The WyomingView program offered four scholarships to undergraduate students to recognize their use of remotely sensed data in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years' recipients; Brett Fahrer, Travis Yeik, Harika Tridandapani, Paul Arendt, Karley Shepperson, William Lamar Gray, and Alyson Courtemanch describe their work below.

27) Paul Arendt (BA Geography)
For my research project I performed a GIS analysis upon several datasets in an effort to find spectral trends within identified areas of mountain pine beetle outbreak in the Medicine Bow National Forest. For me, this project served as an excellent introduction to the process of scientific research.

He presented his work in the 2010 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 24, 2010.
Title: Utilizing Landsat TM and Forest Service aerial survey data for mapping Mountain Pine Beetle outbreak in Medicine Bow National Forest, WY.

His presentation can be viewed at UW Digital Library.

26) Karley Shepperson (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
She presented her work in the 2010 Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day on April 24, 2010.
Title: Assessing the suitability of Landsat satellite data for distinguishing cheatgrass infested sites near midwest WY.

Her presentation can be viewed at UW Digital Library.



25) Brett Fahrer (BS Geography)
I am a senior currently working towards earning a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Geography with a concentration in Geographic Information Systems. My project revolved around the digitization of open spaces within the Copper King area of Medicine Bow National Forest. From these data, I was able to determine the change in area of such open spaces between 1992 and 2001. This project allowed me to explore not only the capabilities of high resolution black-white and color infrared aerial photography in solving complex problems, but also gave me valuable experience of using remotely sensed data to derive various GIS datasets. From this opportunity, I was able to learn how to apply various keys of aerial photo interpretation, which will help me to pursue further study associated with GIS and remote sensing, as well as apply such lessons in a myriad of careers.

24) Travis Yeik (BS Geography)
Using remote sensing for solving environmental issues has taught me many beneficial skills such as problem solving, classifying land cover, and modeling changes in the land. I have learned how to classify the productivity of agricultural land through multiple years of production for management use by the farmer.

 

23) Harika Tridandapani (MS Computer Science)
Testimony and photo not available.

22) William Lamar Gray (MA Geography/Planning)
I am a first-generation Native American graduate student at the University of Wyoming. My research area is in natural resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation for the Wind River Environmental Quality Commission. I hope to create simple research models that will find use among local government agencies that manage natural resources. The study involves using the geospatial technologies of geographic information systems and remote sensing to assess change in water-surface area of inland water bodies such as lakes and reservoirs. A unique aspect of this study is that it offers the end-user a technique to use the free archive of LandSat images in a time series for analysis of how past management practices and/or climate change may have impacted a water resource.


21) Alyson B. Courtemanch (MS Zoology & Physiology)
I am currently working toward a master’s degree in Zoology & Physiology. For this project, I used remote sensing to investigate patterns of snow cover distribution within and between years in the Teton Range in northwest Wyoming. Results showed that remote sensing data can be used successfully to map changes in snow cover in a mountainous region, information which is useful in a variety of applications, including predicting summer water availability, soil moisture, vegetation quality, fire potential, and wildlife movement and habitat use. This project allowed me to gain experience processing and interpreting satellite images, a skill which will be useful in my thesis work and in a future wildlife biology career. Through this project, I realized the benefits of integrating landscape-level remote sensing data into wildlife and ecological studies.

2008-'09

The WyomingView program offered four scholarships to undergraduate students to recognize their use of remotely sensed data in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years' recipients; J. Garrett Klein, Laramie Wiginton, Adam J. Stephens, and Brice J. Stanton, describe their work below.

20) J. Garrett Klein (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I graduated with a B.S. in Agricultural Business from the University of Wyoming, and am taking extra classes in Rangeland ecology for a second degree.

For my project I worked closely with Laramie Wiginton to look at a Farm in Fremont County to determine if Landsat imagery can be used to determine productivity across a fields acreage. I enjoyed working with remote sensing and learning something new to possibly apply to my own farm some day.



19) Laramie J. Wiginton (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I had a great time in this class last semester. I think that this kind of technology can be very useful in the future. I worked with it a little this summer and I think the future looks very bright for range, crop, and wildlife lands. My Remote Sensing class went pretty in depth about all the things this technology can do and if I were to ever get a masters degree this would be something I would be interested in.





18) Adam J. Stephens (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Learning about remote sensing has given me a much better understanding of effective techniques which can be used for a wide variety of natural resource management applications.  I feel that the knowledge of remote sensing methods that I have gained will help me become a competitive applicant for jobs in natural resource fields, and make me a more valuable employee once I am employed.

Adam (& Brice) presented their research paper in the 2008 UW Undergraduate Research Day.  
Title: Mapping Burn Severity within the Grizzly Gulch Fire Using Remote Sensing Techniques.

Their presentation can be viewed at UW Digital Library.


17) Brice J. Stanton (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I learned many different things by taking the remote sensing class. Working at the forest service I knew that they used remote sensing to help make management decisions. In this class I learned how to use remote sensing and apply it to the forest, by either grass management, or by being able to map a fire, and by learning how to do this I will be able to use what I have learned to be able to make decisions on the forest that I work.

Brice (& Adam) presented their research paper in the 2008 UW Undergraduate Research Day.
Title: Mapping Burn Severity within the Grizzly Gulch Fire Using Remote Sensing Techniques.

Their presentation can be viewed at UW Digital Library.


2007-'08

The WyomingView program offered four scholarships in support of undergraduate and graduate students using remotely sensed data in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years recipients; Elizabeth Parrish, Abigail Martin, Moriah Shadwick, Ashley Whitman, Vincent Salerno.

16) Vincent Salerno (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)

Vince presented his research paper in the 2008 UW Undergraduate Research Day.
Title: Satellite Remote Sensing Technology for Identifying Variability in Sugar Beet Growth.

His presentation can be viewed at the UW Digital Library





15) Ashley Whitmann (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
I gained invaluable knowledge from my remote sensing project. I was able to become familiar with several remote sensing programs. This experience has really opened my eyes to the scope of uses for remote sensing. Thankfully the internship made my experience possible.

14) Elizabeth Parrish (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Testimony and photo not available.

13) Abigail Martin (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Testimony and photo not available.

12) Moriah Shadwick (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
Testimony and photo not available.

2006-'07

The WyomingView program offered four scholarships in support of undergraduate and graduate students using remotely sensed data in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years recipients; Mathew Seymour, Tess Anderson, Curtis McCann, David Cook.

11) Mathew Seymour (BS Rangeland Eco & Watershed Mgt)
The USGS and Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station provided me an opportunity to work closely with an outstanding group of professionals. With AEROCam photographs, and professional help, I created a vegetation map of the Roger’s Research area in Northeastern Albany County using heads up digitizing. This experience has taught me valuable lessons in remote sensing and professionalism that will further academic and professional career. I would like to thank Wyoming View and my project mentors for their dedication and patience throughout this project.


10) Tess Anderson (BS Geography)
I was fortunate enough to be awarded an internship through the WyomingView scholarship fund at WyGISC to further my understanding of remote sensing as it relates to managing natural resources. Through the WyomingView scholarship opportunity, I have been able to further my experience and knowledge in the ArcGIS and the remote sensing field. I was able to work with Eli Rodemaker to gain experience using ArcGIS and ERDAS software in determining the impact of oil wells on Sage grouse habitatat in western Wyoming. It was a good opportunity to work with a federal agency in order to gain the skills necessary to perform tasks related to natural resources management.


9) Curtis Mccann (BS Geography)
I am a senior majoring in Geography focused on Geographic Information Science. Working as an intern on the Wyoming View project gave me a grand opportunity to experience how specialized projects are carried out using remote sensing technology. My project was focused on mapping irrigated lands in Uinta, Lincoln, Sweetwater, Sublette, Fremont, Teton, Hot Springs, and Park Counties using the 2006 LandSat Imagery. I hope to use this experience in my future career by using remote sensing and GIS technology as a tool in natural resources management.

8) David Cook(MA Geography)
As a recipient of the WyomingView scholarship, I have acquired a great deal of practical experience and background concerning the classification of air photos. My project, land-use change in the Sheridan Area Water Supply’s (SAWS) service area (Sheridan, Wyoming), has greatly enhanced my ability to recognize and classify different types of land-use based on the spatial texture and pattern of the land. Furthermore, by developing a key containing the minimum mapping unit (MMU) for each land-use group, prior to classification, I was able to justify my decision of which land-use category a piece of land should be allotted. I have no doubt that understanding gained from this program will be put to good use in future remote sensing and GIS endeavors.

2005-'06

The WyomingView program was pleased this year to offer five scholarships in support of undergraduate and graduate students using remotely sensed data and geographic information science in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. Wyoming Agriculture Experiment Station and Drs. Reiners and Knight (UW – Botany Department) provided matching contributions. This years recipients; Madison Ellison, Andrew Prior, Tanna George, Brian Flemister, and Julia Angstmann, describe their work below.

7) Madison Ellison (BS Biology)
I recently graduated with a B.S. in biology at the University of Wyoming and I’m continuing my education with a masters in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management. I received the WyomingView Scholarship after taking a Remote Sensing course where I presented my project at a national conference in North Dakota. My remote sensing class was excellent and made me realize the important ways that remote sensing can benefit agriculture. My project focused on the potential to predict crop yield from aerial images. At the conference, I learned that farmers are using remote sensing to locate problem areas on their land so they can take corrective actions before the damage is done thus saving them money.

6) Tanna George (BS Biology)
I am grateful to have received a WYGISC $650 scholarship this past spring. The scholarship and internship provided me with a wonderful experience. For my internship, I worked on a project with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture. I used WyomingView imagery to analyze conifer encroachment in the Snow Range over a 10 year span. Using ArcView software, I was able to classify open grazing lands in several designated grazing allotments. My internship has led to summer employment with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, where I am able to continue with the project. The data that I helped to collect and analyze will possibly be used in future grazing allotment management plans. The scholarship was much appreciated, and I feel honored to have received the award.

5) Brian Flemister (BS Geography)
I am a senior working toward a bachelor’s degree in Geography. In my project I utilized Landsat imagery to develop a large-scale wall map as well as a classified map of the Laramie Basin. This project was done in conjunction with the Dr. William Reiners and Dr. Dennis Knight, UW Botany department to distinguish vegetation characteristics between a year with average precipitation and a year with below average precipitation. From this opportunity I have discovered many exciting possibilities in the area of remote sensing that I hope to follow into a graduate level degree. It was a wonderful experience that I am glad to have been a part of.


4) Andrew Prior  (BS Geography)
Testimony and photo not available.

3) Julia Angstmann (PhD Ecology/Botany)
I received the WyomingView scholarship after taking a course in remote sensing. Through the course I was able to understand the many uses of remote sensing in ecological studies. As a graduate student in the course, I developed a remote sensing project to study the differences between well- and poorly drained boreal forest burns. Many previous studies have been conducted researching the use of remote sensing imagery to predict leaf area of the dominant tree species for application in climate and ecophysiological modeling. Distinguishing between well- and poorly-drained areas may have important implications in the accuracy of models and scaling from individual-level measurements to holistic canopy resolutions. I am thankful for the scholarship because it has allowed me to add an interesting and integral component to my PhD research.

2004-'05

The WyomingView program was pleased this year to offer two $1000 scholarships in support of undergraduate and graduate students using remotely sensed data and geographic information science in their research. These scholarships were made possible by generous support from the USGS and AmericaView Inc. which fund WyomingView. This years recipients of the awards, Dulce Boles and Scott Kelley, describe their work below.

2) Scott Kelley (BS Geography)
In addition to the funding I received from the Wyoming Space Grant Program, I was the recipient of the $1000 WyGISC award. This valuable amount of funding will be used mainly for salary to complete the project.

Additional funding means that we can put in additional time and effort into the work we are trying to accomplish. The rest of the funding will go towards covering the cost of transportation to reach work areas in the field. Thank you to WyGISC for this generous award!




1) Dulce Boles (MS Geography)
I’m Dulce Boles, and my thesis project is entitled “GIS and Remote Sensing at the Old Fort Laramie Cemetery.” The $1000.00 Wyoming View scholarship will help me in several ways. First it has allowed me the opportunity to attend a workshop in geophysical prospection (or remote sensing) at archaeological sites. This week long workshop was recently held in Ohio, and covered the theory and use of different geophysical instruments. I was able to discuss my thesis project with many of the top professionals in the field, learning new data processing and “ground truthing” techniques. This has directly benefited my thesis project by giving me new ways to analyze and test my data.

Through the scholarship, I will also be able to return to the field this summer and test the results of my thesis work. I have planned to spend five days in the field looking for graves based on the maps generated by the geophysical instruments. This “ground truthing” will be conducted in relatively nondestructive ways, including the use of a metal detector, soil compaction meter, and 4” bucket auger. Finally, my thesis work will be published by the park service, and included in the annual archaeological report for Fort Laramie. This will provide a comparative basis for future research in remote sensing.